Tuesday, November 13, 2012

The Life of a Long Term Transitioner


When I reached the one-year mark of my transitioning from relaxed to natural hair, I could officially consider myself as a long term transitioner. Unlike other transitioners that have struggled through the journey, mine has been relatively smooth sailing. I am not saying I did not have my issues with tangling up and breakage, but my natural hair has cooperated well with my relaxed ends, most of the time.

Yesterday, as I started my moisturizing and sealing process, I suddenly had to urge to do some "chopping". No, not big chop style, but a trim, which to some might seem like a mini-chop.


So, I decided to chop about 2 inches off my relaxed ends. In some areas, I was a little bit scissor-happy, LOL, and took off about 2.5 inches. Overall, I am happy that I did. Now, looking at the amount of relaxed ends I have and the rate my hair is growing, I am giving this journey about 6-8 more months.

But then again....who knows.

Until then, I will continue doing what I have been doing...
  • Washing my hair, once a week.
  • Putting it in a protective style for 5-6 days out of the week.
  • Deep conditioning, once a week.
  • Co-washing with a moisturizing conditioner, three times a month.
  • Washing with a sulfate-free shampoo or a clarifing shampoo (if buildup exists), once a month.
  • Moisturizing and sealing regularly.

Are you a Long Term Transitioner? What struggles are you having? What have you learnt so far?


4 comments:

  1. I class myself as a long term transitioner because I know that I won't be chopping until I'm about 2 years post. I want to be comfortable with my hair. I've learnt that my hair need TLC, moisture and a lil bit of loving ;)
    So far, my journey has also been plain sailing (excluding my d/c experiments)
    Your hair growth looks lush! :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks. Wishing you continue success on your journey.

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  2. Replies
    1. Sealing is a way to moisturize your hair and lock in the moisture thereby preventing or minimizing breakage and split ends. Here is a log post where I go more in depth about sealing: http://discoveringnatural.blogspot.com/2012/03/sealing-your-ends.html

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